Welcome to "Political Science in the Digital Age"

IPSA is sponsoring an international conference from 4-6 December this year 2017, organized by Marianne Kneuer and Helen Milner. The conference, entitled “Political Science in the Digital Age: Mapping Opportunities, Perils and Uncertainties,“ provides the opportunity for a reflection on the discipline and one of its most relevant challenges, namely digitalization. At the same time, the conference aims to bring together national Political Science Associations, other IPSA members, and the IPSA Research Committees in order to further develop networks and cooperation among these groups. The conference also will be a platform for addressing problems as well as designing ideas for future research within IPSA.

Digitalization and digital communication constitute a major challenge not only for politics but also for our discipline in manifold aspects: research, teaching and learning, data collection, data dissemination and protection, innovative methods, etc. It is important that political scientists reflect on the current and future implications that the digital age holds for the discipline. The aim of the conference is to examine these challenges adopting a broad approach that draws on numerous fields such as Comparative Politics, International Relations, Political Theory and Research Methods. Furthermore, we will examine how digitalization affects the academic sphere in terms of teaching and learning, publishing, editing, and finally consulting. Since IPSA can bring together scholars from around the world, the conference will explore how the presence of digital media influences politics as well as the discipline itself in different regions around the globe.


Keynote Speaker

Professor José van DijckProfessor José van Dijck
Utrecht University / President of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences
Website

José van Dijck is a distinguished university professor at the University of Utrecht (The Netherlands) and the president of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Van Dijck’s academic discipline is media studies and her field of interests ‘digital society.’ She received her PhD from the University of California, San Diego, (USA) in 1992. Her work covers a wide range of topics in media theory, media and communication technologies, social media, and digital culture. She is the author of six books, three co-edited volumes and approximately one hundred journal articles and book chapters. Van Dijck’s book The Culture of Connectivity. A Critical History of Social Media (Oxford UP, 2013) was distributed worldwide and was recently translated into Spanish. She is currently working on a book with Thomas Poell and Martijn de Waal titled The Platform Society. Public values in a connective world; the Dutch version was published in November 2016 and the English book is due in 2018 with Oxford University Press.

 

Keynote Address - Public values in a global online society

ABSTRACT

Online digital platforms, which are overwhelmingly American-based and operated, have penetrated every sector of American and Western-European societies, disrupting markets and labor relations, circumventing institutions, and transforming social and civic practices. Platforms steer users’ behavior and social traffic that is increasingly data-driven and algorithmically organized. They are gradually infiltrating in, and clashing with, the institutional processes through which European democratic societies are organized. Platforms are neither neutral nor value-free constructs; the norms and values inscribed in their architectures may clash with the societal structures in which they are gradually embedded. So the emerging ‘platform society’ involves an intense struggle between competing ideological systems and contesting societal actors—market, government and civil society—raising important questions like: Who is or should be responsible and accountable for anchoring public values in a platform society?

 

Public values include of course privacy, accuracy, safety, and security, but they also pertain to broader societal effects, such as fairness, accessibility, democratic control, and accountability. Public values and the common good are the very stakes in the struggle over the platformization of societies around the globe. This lecture concentrates on the position of European (private and public) interests vis-à-vis the interests of an American online ecosystem, driven by a handful of high-tech corporations (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft) that have become global data mining companies. While fights over regulation play out at various local and national levels, they cannot be seen apart from the power clashes between global high-tech companies and (supra-)national governments. At the heart of the online media’s industry’s surge is the battle over information control: who owns the data generated by online social activities? Particularly in the European context, governments can be proactive in negotiating public values on behalf of citizens and consumers.

 

 


The conference is supported by the Volkswagen Foundation.

Volkswagen Foundation


The German Political Science Association is providing a travel grant.

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